Monday

Healthcare shopping is always required doing




Negotiating for a Better Deal is Always a Good Idea

I sometimes I think Americans have never really acquired the fine art of haggling for a good deal. I used to marvel at a neighbor of my Mothers. She was truly the master of the fine art of getting the best deal in town. I remember during my high school years I would from time to time give her a small hand doing a small projects she was involved with. On this one occasion I was cleaning up the basement area of an apartment complex that she rented out and lived in. During this time I was sweeping and rearranging things per her instructions, at the same time she was also was negotiating with a heating and plumbing person to update part of her heating system. And I couldn’t help but chuckle how she managed to get the deal she was looking for. First he wrote up a work order and presented it to her. She then with the patience of a saint slowly maneuvered in and out adding or deleting things that she wanted done. When the dust cleared and he said this is my last and final offer she added the last word on the transaction with would you prefer cash of check? Cash of course was his response. And then she said you let me know the day your going to be done and Ill gather up the money so I can pay you when your finished. It’s amazing how givers of service smile when they heard those words. Now in case your not aware there are two reasons why cash is most of the time preferred by contractors. One: Cash doesn’t required to be put in the books of the business, thus paying taxes isn’t a high priority. Two: Contractors are always in a state of flux one minute they have enough money and next their borrowing money to pay their bills and labor requirements. A contractor friend of mine told me that lawyers are the worse in paying their bills; they know the law and use that knowledge to make contractors wait till the cow comes home before they get paid.

She Always Get the Best Deal

I sometimes wonder if my lovely wife didn’t apprentice under this neighbor lady. My wife also knows the in and out of getting the deal breaking deal. She practices this art of haggling differently then the previous haggler but the results are the same. My wife has numerous incredible abilities and reading the fine print is one of them. Yesterday she spent five minutes sitting in her favorite chair and developed her game plan for going shopping. She said while exiting the house that this is the best day of the week. Later in the day I learned why? It was double coupon day and that small trip to the grocery store saved us sixty-four green backs and that’s a couple fine tasting bottles of wine.

Never Take the First Offer

Here’s the jest of what I’m trying to explain savings are everywhere and shopping around is a great way to make a deal you can live cheaper with. Not too long ago I had to leave the comfort of my almost twenty years of working for a municipality and join the ranks of those being on their own to find the best deal they could. All to often which was discovered by my neighbor who discovered better deals are gained by not taking the first offer that comes down the pike. He like I would if not for the diligence of my lovely wife grabbed the first healthcare supplement made to him. He was explaining his decision and my wife couldn’t help but hear what he was saying. He chose a health plan we turned down because quoting his words I trusted the person I was talking to. Apparently they used to be car-selling salesmen and because of that he just knew he was getting the best deal in town. My wife called our healthcare provider they called him and reviewed his policy and saved him an addition twenty percent.

Get the Best Reduction You Can

My wife has by her diligence proved over and over again that the first offer is seldom if ever the best offer. Sure it requires effort and more gas for the car or more time on the phone but isn’t saving money a good thing in your life?

Practice Dropping

Shopping till you drop will most assuredly lower your healthcare costs and that’s something you can take to the bank.


Don L. Terrill

photo by Robby van Moor